Wednesday, February 22, 2017

A Federal Court of Appeals Goes to War against the Second Amendment

A Federal Court of Appeals Goes to War against the Second Amendment
Willfully ignorant. "First, let’s look at the court’s breathtaking contempt for individual rights. Rather than read the Supreme Court’s controlling opinion in District of Columbia v. Heller according to its plain language, it deliberately distorts Justice Antonin Scalia’s majority opinion. In Heller, Scalia clearly stated that the sorts of weapons the Second Amendment protects are those that are “in common use at the time,” with exceptions that apply to those weapons that are “dangerous and unusual.” Why the addition of “and” unusual? Because every single working gun ever made is dangerous. To illustrate his point, Scalia then provides examples of specific types of “dangerous and unusual” guns — “M-16 rifles and the like.” Here’s a news flash: The M-16 isn’t the same as a civilian “assault weapon” like the AR-15. The M-16 variants in use in the United States military are capable of being fired in both semi-automatic and fully automatic (three-round burst) modes. If you think that the M-16 and AR-15 are alike, then walk to your local gun store and try to buy an M-16. Go ahead. I’ll wait. Are you back yet? Do you have an M-16? No? That’s because it’s an entirely different category of weapon, governed by different federal statutes. The Fourth Circuit, however, deliberately conflated semi-automatic weapons and automatic weapons. And it went to absurd lengths to do so. To illustrate how, let’s turn to the next part of the formula — willful ignorance. In discussing the civilian, semi-automatic AR-15, the court comprehensively described the history of the military, fully automatic weapon that became the M-16 (and also the lighter and shorter M-4). Then, attempting to equate the M-16 and the AR-15, it published this spit-out-your-coffee sentence: “Semiautomatic weapons can be fired at rates of 300 to 500 rounds per minute, making them virtually indistinguishable in practical effect from machineguns.” The word “rates” does a lot of work in that sentence. Yes, a person can pull the trigger very quickly on a semi-auto rifle (of any type) for a very short time. No, you cannot send 300 to 500 rounds downrange in one minute. You can’t even do it with an M-16 in burst mode."

io9

io9

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

ProPublica on Twitter

ProPublica on Twitter
Good. Now just remember this when a Democrat is in charge again.

‘Every person deserves to rest in peace:’ American Muslims raising money to repair vandalized Jewish cemetery

‘Every person deserves to rest in peace:’ American Muslims raising money to repair vandalized Jewish cemetery

Moe Lane » ‘Perform This Way’ (Pre- and post-CGI).

Moe Lane » ‘Perform This Way’ (Pre- and post-CGI).
Neat.

What the president of Y Combinator learned from interviewing 100 Trump supporters

What the president of Y Combinator learned from interviewing 100 Trump supporters
Good information. "Altman also asked supporters what they didn't like about Trump (“I hate that he discredits the press all the time. That seems to forebode great evil.”), what makee them nervous about Trump (“The thing I’m most worried about is war, and that he could destroy the whole world.), what they think of the Left's response to Trump so far (“You need to give us an opportunity to admit we may have been wrong without saying we’re bad people. I am already thinking I made a mistake, but I feel ostracized from my community.”), and what would convince them to note vote for Trump again ("If the Russia thing were true, I’d turn against him. Why don’t y’all focus on that instead of his tweets?”). This is essential reading."

Monday, February 20, 2017

Marco.org

Marco.org
The best podcast player gets better.

Sonny Bunch on Twitter

Sonny Bunch on Twitter
Well, this is evergreen.

The Hill

The Hill
They should never have picked him in the first place.

Faces in Things on Twitter

Faces in Things on Twitter
Horseption.

Deleting Uber is the least you can do

Deleting Uber is the least you can do
Why not to expect much to change at uber. "But it sure didn’t take long until that monster lurking within was unleashed. Before working with Trump, before this latest sexual harassment scandal, Uber’s rap sheet already included sabotaging competitors, threatening journalists, repeatedly deceiving drivers, and much more. Yet none of it has so far really mattered much, as Uber has proven the Silicon Valley maxim that “growth solves all problems”. And grown they have! Supposedly worth some $66 billion now, they’re the #1 Unicorn in the world of tech. That’s about as good of a moral immunity policy as you can get in Silicon Valley. There are simply too many people who have either actual money at stake, or correlated investments on the line, to expect much internal pressure from Silicon Valley for Uber to change its ways."

Former Swedish PM: More murders in Florida than in all of Sweden last year

Former Swedish PM: More murders in Florida than in all of Sweden last year

Disney finally nails free-roaming wireless power delivery

Disney finally nails free-roaming wireless power delivery
But there's a catch.

Sunday, February 19, 2017

Reflecting on one very, very strange year at Uber

Reflecting on one very, very strange year at Uber
So, Uber is scuzzier than I thought.

The Hill

The Hill

Sweden demands US to clarify Trump's remarks on nonexistent terrorism incident

Sweden demands US to clarify Trump's remarks on nonexistent terrorism incident

Microsoft News, Reviews and Analysis featuring Paul Thurrott – Windows, Office, Mobile & More

Microsoft News, Reviews and Analysis featuring Paul Thurrott – Windows, Office, Mobile & More
Skipping v2 to make v3.

CRS-10 | Falcon 9 First Stage Landing

CRS-10 | Falcon 9 First Stage Landing

Bill Gates and Elon Musk just warned us about the one thing politicians are too scared to talk…

Bill Gates and Elon Musk just warned us about the one thing politicians are too scared to talk…
This will happen to us like bankruptcy is often described, 'slowly, then all at once'. Entire categories of jobs will just go away. There will be new kinds of jobs, likely that we don't even know about now, but those will take years, if not decades to be created. That leaves people with now automated jobs in a lurch.